The Michigan Value Collaborative

Helping Michigan hospitals achieve their best possible patient outcomes at the lowest reasonable cost

Tag: discharge planning (page 1 of 3)

Transitions of Care Enhanced by I-MPACT, a BCBSM CQI

Pam James

Pam James, MS is the I-MPACT Program Manager

The Integrated Michigan Patient Centered Alliance in Care Transitions Collaborative (I-MPACT) is a Blue Cross Blue Shield Value Partnership collaborative quality initiative (CQI) which was established in 2015 and formally launched with an inaugural kick-off for cohort one in April 2016. This CQI has several aspects that make its approach to quality improvement unique. Hospitals and physician organizations (PO) are required to partner with each other to better coordinate care and ultimately improve patient outcomes and experiences; that partnership is called a “cluster”. Another unique feature of I-MPACT is the incorporation of patient or caregiver advisors on each cluster team. These patient advisors are an integral part of the team and, to encourage continued participation and ensure the patient’s voice is heard, the clusters have to provide information to I-MPACT how the patients are integrated into and utilized on any projects or initiatives. Lastly, each cluster is evaluated as one entity for the Pay for Performance Index (P4P) to encourage collaboration, equity and inclusion between them. The entire cluster, both hospitals and POs, can earn additional dollars based on their cluster’s score on the P4P.

The ultimate goal for I-MPACT is to help improve care transitions for patients. I-MPACT strives to accomplish this goal by focusing on three key areas:

  1. Increasing the frequency with which patients are seen by a provider within 7 days of discharge,
  2. Working on reducing readmissions,
  3. Working on reducing Emergency Department visits.

I-MPACT currently has 20 hospital and PO clusters which are divided into 4 groups or cohorts. Data extraction centers around key documents in the care transition process including the discharge summary, patient summary/after visit summary and the admitting history and physical. The goal is to understand more about processes and communication during the care transition and gain a better understanding of where gaps and challenges are occurring.

I-MPACT focuses on five specific patient populations which were strategically chosen to align with other collaboratives and Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) initiatives. The five conditions are:

  1. Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI),
  2. Congestive Heart Failure (CHF),
  3. Pneumonia,
  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD),
  5. Patients transitioning from hospital to a skilled nursing facility (SNF).

I-MPACT helps their members understand the care transition process, especially from a patient perspective by performing an on-site observation of a patient’s discharge process and mapping the data gathered in a document called “the patient journey”.

Upon joining I-MPACT each new cluster, along with their patient advisors, attend a day long kick off where they work through mapping out a transition process, identifying gaps and challenges in their organizations’ care transitions and brain storming interventions aimed at addressing those gaps and challenges.

If you would like more information about I-MPACT check out their website at http://www.impactcqi.org/, contact Pamela James,  the Project Manager at  I-MPACTCC@med.umich.edu or contact the MVC Coordinating Center through Abeer Yassine (abeery@med.umich.edu ) or Deb Evans (debevans@med.umich.edu)

McLaren- Lansing: Using Change as an Opportunity for Optimizing Palliative Care

Kim Hecksel

McLaren- Lansing Palliative Care nurses from left to right: Kim, RN, Paula, CNP and Carol, RN

Although the palliative care program at McLaren- Lansing has been around for about a decade, health care organizations are constantly changing and evolving to meet patient and family needs. The MVC Coordinating Center had the opportunity to speak to the team of case managers and nurses from McLaren- Lansing to hear about the different successes and barriers to palliative care at this facility. One distinct characteristic of this palliative care program is that patients and families are seen by and interact with consistent faces, rather than different clinicians, each time they visit. McLaren uses this consistency as leverage through transitions of care, especially at a time when clinician duties and health organizations are constantly changing.

The palliative care program at McLaren- Lansing also keeps up with the constant changes in health care by utilizing different online resources. One resource available to hospitals interested in palliative care programs is the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC). CAPC offers a platform to help provide different health care organizations across the nation the tools and resources needed to advance palliative care programs in their respective institutions. For example, some CAPC resources help palliative care teams set up and develop a business plan for their respective palliative care programs. CAPC resources are helping guide the McLaren- Lansing team in creating a business model that illustrates the financial impact of a palliative care program on the health system. For more information on CAPC and the resources they can provide, visit www.capc.org.

The palliative care team also looks at the big picture of the care provided to patients and consequently putting together different pieces of information to ultimately develop a course of treatment that best meets the needs of the patients and the family involved. One of the barriers McLaren- Lansing has with their palliative care program is working with patients, family members and other health care providers on understanding the value of palliative care and what it really offers. When met with this resistance, the palliative care team works in different ways on learning about and discussing the care plan and goal setting to find the right format for communication and understanding a diverse patient population. For example, the palliative care team engages with physicians one-on-one and attends presentations on the benefits of palliative care to better understand and work with patients and their families about their diagnosis and individualized care plan. Taking advantage of different resources available, such as CAPC, and instilling a strong support system among the palliative care team and liaising teams are factors that aid in instituting a successful palliative care program.

If you are interested in learning more about the palliative care program at McLaren- Lansing, please feel free to reach out to Deby (debevans@med.umich.edu) or Abeer (abeery@med.umich.edu) for more information and contact.

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