The Michigan Value Collaborative

Helping Michigan hospitals achieve their best possible patient outcomes at the lowest reasonable cost

Tag: joint replacement (page 1 of 3)

Using Clinical Pillars to enhance value in a Joint Replacement Bundled Payment Program

Deby Evans

Deb Evans is the MVC Site Engagement Manager

An article published in the Journal of Arthroplasty in June 2017 discussed 5 clinical pillars that one hospital in New York identified for enhancing value in their joint replacement practices through the bundled payment program.

  1. Optimizing patient selection and comorbidities: The hospital identified common comorbidities within their Total Joint Arthroplasty (TJA) patient population. The most frequent were found to be musculoskeletal comorbidities, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, tobacco use and diabetes. Each of these comorbidities is associated with an increased risk for readmission. By incorporating the use of a readmission risk assessment tool (RRAT) into the Perioperative Orthopedic Surgical Home (POSH) initiative, the hospital identifies patients that are at high risk for readmission and delays surgery in favor of working to optimize the patient’s modifiable risk factors. By getting the patient in optimal condition for surgery, the risk of an unplanned readmission can be reduced, saving the hospital the associated costs.
  2. Optimizing care coordination, patient education, shared decision-making and patient expectations: Multiple studies have shown that splintered care pathways, unnecessary services and a lack of patient-centered care negatively impact clinical outcomes. Characteristics of programs that displayed improved patient outcomes were synchronized management among the patient’s care team and managing the expectations of the patient and family. The goal for this hospital was to institute a streamlined pathway for the duration of the episode of care that focused on collaborative decision making and standardized pathway criteria.
  3. Multimodal analgesia: An increased length of stay not only affects cost but also increases the risk of readmission. One of the factors known to influence length of stay is pain management. This facility reviewed their pain management protocol and made changes with the intention of decreasing opioid use while maintaining pain relief as well as facilitating early ambulation and rehabilitation and decreasing falls. These principles help to reduce length of stay by expediting discharge and decreasing the use of post-acute care facilities.
  4. Risk-stratified Venous Thromboembolic disease (VTED) prophylaxis: Use of an aggressive mode of VTED prophylaxis may be effective in preventing venous thrombosis, but has also shown to increase the risk of major complications. The institution performed a study to analyze their adapted risk-stratification algorithm with positive results. The use of this algorithm to identify which VTED prophylaxis trajectory was most appropriate helped the hospital optimize care and reduce costs.
  5. Minimize Post-acute care facility and resource utilization: Increased costs have been shown to be related to the use of post-acute care facilities and the associated resource utilization. In an effort to help control post-acute care costs, this institution worked on identifying selected post-acute care partners. Once identified the hospital and the partnering skilled nursing facility increased communication and collaboration through meetings and performance and resource utilization monitoring. By establishing these partnerships post-acute care length of stay was reduced with associated cost savings.

Through focusing on these five clinical pillars, this New York hospital was able to identify areas of improvement and subsequently implement initiatives targeted towards care and cost improvement. If your hospital is interested in identifying five clinical pillars of focus, the MVC Coordinating Center can help  identify common readmission diagnoses, along with post- acute care SNF utilization and length of stay information.

Moreover, the MVC Coordinating Center, in conjunction with MARCQI and MOPEN, is also holding workgroups on November 30th and December 7th to discuss pre- and post- surgical pain management. If you are interested in joining either of the workgroups, please register here.

Please contact Abeer Yassine at abeery@med.umich.edu or Deb Evans at debevans@med.umich.edu  for more information and if you have any questions.

Combating Surgical Site Infections in Michigan: Joint Replacement Workgroup Recap and Hospital Initiatives

Deby Evans

Deb Evans is the MVC Site Engagement Manager

The Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) and the Michigan Arthroplasty Registry Collaborative Quality Initiative (MARCQI) held a recent workgroup focused on surgical site infections (SSI) related to joint replacement. Hospitals met to discuss some of the root causes for these infections and initiatives they have implemented to help reduce them.

Below is one of the presented slides that exhibits the proportion of readmissions due to SSI’s for MVC/MARCQI hospitals based on MVC claims data:

Although many of the hospitals have done extensive analysis and in-depth review of pre-, intra- and post-operative joint conditions, few specific root causes for surgical site infections have been identified.  However, major focus areas for hospital-led initiatives that have been identified are:

  • Improving the general health of the patient especially in terms of reducing the body mass index (BMI);
  • Improving hemoglobin A1C for diabetics;
  • Improving albumin levels; and
  • Tobacco cessation

One hospital recently began an initiative aimed at helping patients become healthier and ultimately maintain an optimal weight for joint-replacement surgery. Referrals for the program come from surgeons prior to the surgery. The initiative includes a weight loss clinic and classes, which offers a refund of the cost of the program if the patient is successful in losing weight before surgery.

Most hospitals are following the Joint Commission recommendations from the Surgical Infection project (SIP) and the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP). However, there are some differences in the identification and treatment of staphylococcus aureus carriers with some hospitals universally treating all joint replacement candidates and some only treating those identified as carriers through a nasal swab.  Although this workgroup only focused on SSIs related to elective joint replacement, it was mentioned that some hospitals are treating their trauma cases for staphylococcus aureus as well, while others are looking at this potential.

Other topics that prompted discussion among the group were wound closure and whether different types of closure affected SSI rates along with the type of dressing being used and the length of time the dressing stayed intact over the wound. There was some variety among surgeons and hospitals, however many are using a moisture-impervious silver based dressing that remains on for about seven days. Despite what may be considered a more expensive dressing being used the benefits of keeping the wound covered and out of contact with potentially infectious elements, i.e. pets, clothes, bed linen etc. outweigh these added costs.  In addition, when comparisons were made between these dressings and changing a dressing daily the difference in cost was negligible.

Finally, patient education was a major talking point during the workgroup. All hospitals agreed that having the patient’s cooperation is a significant factor in reducing SSI. Some hospitals have produced videos for patient viewing pre-operatively while others have an educational sheet that they provide to the patient before the surgery. Some discussion focused on the amount of information that the patients are expected to retain and ways hospitals are sharing reminders using booklets, pamphlets, a coach that is known to the patient or being seen by a discharge planner.

The Coordinating Center has put together a pre-, intra and post-operative check list of things to consider to potentially help reduce SSI, as well as a hygiene at home sheet for patients. These can be found in the resource tab on the registry along with information from our other workgroups.

If you have identified any specific root causes or have a new initiative aimed at reducing surgical site infections, then we would love to hear from you. Please contact Deb Evans (debevans@med.umich.edu) or Abeer Yassine (abeery@med.umich.edu) to share your story.  Preference

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