The Michigan Value Collaborative

Helping Michigan hospitals achieve their best possible patient outcomes at the lowest reasonable cost

Tag: MVC (page 1 of 3)

McLaren- Lansing: Using Change as an Opportunity for Optimizing Palliative Care

Kim Hecksel

McLaren- Lansing Palliative Care nurses from left to right: Kim, RN, Paula, CNP and Carol, RN

Although the palliative care program at McLaren- Lansing has been around for about a decade, health care organizations are constantly changing and evolving to meet patient and family needs. The MVC Coordinating Center had the opportunity to speak to the team of case managers and nurses from McLaren- Lansing to hear about the different successes and barriers to palliative care at this facility. One distinct characteristic of this palliative care program is that patients and families are seen by and interact with consistent faces, rather than different clinicians, each time they visit. McLaren uses this consistency as leverage through transitions of care, especially at a time when clinician duties and health organizations are constantly changing.

The palliative care program at McLaren- Lansing also keeps up with the constant changes in health care by utilizing different online resources. One resource available to hospitals interested in palliative care programs is the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC). CAPC offers a platform to help provide different health care organizations across the nation the tools and resources needed to advance palliative care programs in their respective institutions. For example, some CAPC resources help palliative care teams set up and develop a business plan for their respective palliative care programs. CAPC resources are helping guide the McLaren- Lansing team in creating a business model that illustrates the financial impact of a palliative care program on the health system. For more information on CAPC and the resources they can provide, visit www.capc.org.

The palliative care team also looks at the big picture of the care provided to patients and consequently putting together different pieces of information to ultimately develop a course of treatment that best meets the needs of the patients and the family involved. One of the barriers McLaren- Lansing has with their palliative care program is working with patients, family members and other health care providers on understanding the value of palliative care and what it really offers. When met with this resistance, the palliative care team works in different ways on learning about and discussing the care plan and goal setting to find the right format for communication and understanding a diverse patient population. For example, the palliative care team engages with physicians one-on-one and attends presentations on the benefits of palliative care to better understand and work with patients and their families about their diagnosis and individualized care plan. Taking advantage of different resources available, such as CAPC, and instilling a strong support system among the palliative care team and liaising teams are factors that aid in instituting a successful palliative care program.

If you are interested in learning more about the palliative care program at McLaren- Lansing, please feel free to reach out to Deby (debevans@med.umich.edu) or Abeer (abeery@med.umich.edu) for more information and contact.

Reducing Readmissions through Quality Discharge Planning

Deby Evans

Deby Evans is the Site Engagement Manager for the MVC Coordinating Center.

According to various literature, the quality of discharge planning can affect the likelihood of readmission. As hospitals search for ways to reduce their readmission rates one of the components to review might be the quality of discharge planning. A recently published study found that not only did higher quality discharge planning result in reduced readmission rates, but it also helped hospital retention rates for those patients that did need readmission. Retention of patients is important not only to maintain continuity of care but also for financial reasons. To read more on the study click here: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1077558716647652

So what does quality discharge planning entail? Another recent study showed that quality discharge planning not only effectively informs patients about their discharge plan, but includes ways in which patients will carry out the plan and have the ability and willingness to execute it. In order for patients to become more actively involved in their discharge plans, hospitals should work in conjunction with their outpatient clinics and utilize many of the available community resources they may have. To read more on this study click here: http://qualitysafety.bmj.com/content/26/1/7.full

Two facilities that have incorporated liaising with outside agencies for quality discharge planning and to ultimately reduce readmissions are: The University of Virginia Health System and Christian Hospital in St Louis.

The University of Virginia (UVA) Health System has developed their Hospital to Home program to focus on the two-week time period after discharge. On the morning of discharge, the members of the entire patient care team meet with the patient thus incorporating all aspects of the patient’s care in to the discharge plan. To also help reduce confusion over the discharge plan, UVA Health System provides the patient with an easily understood discharge summary; one that contains no uncertainty or dubious information. This discharge summary is reviewed not only with the patient but with a family member as well. For heart failure patients, a one-hour long appointment at an in-hospital clinic is scheduled between four and seven days after discharge. During this appointment, a nurse practitioner reviews medication and diet. For more on UVA click here: http://www.hhnmag.com/articles/8327-case-study-post-discharge-planning-cuts-readmissions-at-uva

On another note, Christian Hospital in St Louis worked with 911 dispatchers and paramedics to reduce the utilization of their emergency department through the Community Health Access Program (CHAP). To help provide patients with the appropriate support they need, Christian Hospital set up access centers with coordinators who develop relationships with patients and are able to help procure resources. The development of CHAP has helped reduce overcrowding in the emergency department, reduce utilization of ambulances and paramedics and improve the quality of life for many in the community. For more on the CHAP program click here: https://www.christianhospital.org/Community/CHAP

Interested in learning more about Hospital to Home programs? Click here: https://cvquality.acc.org/initiatives/hospital-to-home

 

 

Older posts