The Michigan Value Collaborative

Helping Michigan hospitals achieve their best possible patient outcomes at the lowest reasonable cost

Tag: SNF (page 1 of 4)

MVC Heart Failure Workgroup Updates and 2018 Opportunities

Deby Evans

Deb Evans is the MVC Site Engagement Manager

The Michigan Value Collaborative (MVC) Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) workgroup has had a productive year of virtual meetings and many useful discussions about a variety of topics that can influence reducing readmissions. Every other month, in collaboration with I-MPACT, another Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan quality improvement collaborative focusing on transitions of care, the group has held discussions on a variety of topics pertaining to CHF. The MVC Coordinating Center will be opening up the workgroup for other hospitals to join in 2018 and additional information can be found below. A synopsis of the findings of each 2017 workgroup discussion is detailed below, although more details can be found on the MVC registry under the resource tab or by contacting the Coordinating Center.

Using Skilled Nursing Facilities: This discussion encouraged working closely with skilled nursing facilities to help provide education to staff, patients, family members and care givers in respect to fluid intake and nutrition.  Additionally, the discussion included how to allow staff to facilitate medication administration and finding alternative ways of medication delivery such as giving Lasix via intramuscular injection rather than intravenously.

CHF Referrals to Palliative Care: The discussion centered around getting this patient population referred to palliative care as soon as possible in the course of their disease process. The conversation included triggers for referral along with some benefits of being in a palliative care program and initiatives that Michigan hospitals had implemented or were working on implementing in relation to palliative care programs in their facilities.

Use of Outpatient Heart Failure (HF) Clinics: The group discussed the effectiveness of having a HF clinic to refer their CHF patients too and how attendance at these clinics had helped reduce CHF readmission rates. Some hospitals discussed the collaborative work they had done to implement a HF clinic in their facility. Templates of business plans were provided and members provided information on how they had presented and made the case to open a HF clinic at their facility. An interview with a Michigan hospital ranked number 3 in the country was utilized for a blog post.

Diet and Nutrition Education: Some dieticians from member hospitals joined us to discuss the tools and information they share with HF patients at their facilities. Information sheets containing information on alternative spices to use instead of salt were shared and also initiatives and education on how to provide heart healthy meals to patients either by the facility or via a vendor such as Meals on Wheels.

Medication Reconciliation: Pharmacists joined the discussion about their role or potential role in medication reconciliation and also provided some recommendations for the use of different stakeholders in the medication reconciliation process, not only for CHF patients but for other patient populations too. Some facilities discussed how they have also integrated parts of the reconciliation process into their electronic health record systems.

The CHF longitudinal workgroup will be continuing into 2018 with more discussion topics pertaining to CHF and opportunities for collaboration. If you are interested in joining the workgroup, please sign up here.  Further details will be provided in 2018.

If you have any questions about the workgroup or 2018 workgroup registration  please contact Abeer Yassine (abeery@med.umich.edu) or Deb Evans (debevans@med.umich.edu)

 

Transitions of Care Enhanced by I-MPACT, a BCBSM CQI

Pam James

Pam James, MS is the I-MPACT Program Manager

The Integrated Michigan Patient Centered Alliance in Care Transitions Collaborative (I-MPACT) is a Blue Cross Blue Shield Value Partnership collaborative quality initiative (CQI) which was established in 2015 and formally launched with an inaugural kick-off for cohort one in April 2016. This CQI has several aspects that make its approach to quality improvement unique. Hospitals and physician organizations (PO) are required to partner with each other to better coordinate care and ultimately improve patient outcomes and experiences; that partnership is called a “cluster”. Another unique feature of I-MPACT is the incorporation of patient or caregiver advisors on each cluster team. These patient advisors are an integral part of the team and, to encourage continued participation and ensure the patient’s voice is heard, the clusters have to provide information to I-MPACT how the patients are integrated into and utilized on any projects or initiatives. Lastly, each cluster is evaluated as one entity for the Pay for Performance Index (P4P) to encourage collaboration, equity and inclusion between them. The entire cluster, both hospitals and POs, can earn additional dollars based on their cluster’s score on the P4P.

The ultimate goal for I-MPACT is to help improve care transitions for patients. I-MPACT strives to accomplish this goal by focusing on three key areas:

  1. Increasing the frequency with which patients are seen by a provider within 7 days of discharge,
  2. Working on reducing readmissions,
  3. Working on reducing Emergency Department visits.

I-MPACT currently has 20 hospital and PO clusters which are divided into 4 groups or cohorts. Data extraction centers around key documents in the care transition process including the discharge summary, patient summary/after visit summary and the admitting history and physical. The goal is to understand more about processes and communication during the care transition and gain a better understanding of where gaps and challenges are occurring.

I-MPACT focuses on five specific patient populations which were strategically chosen to align with other collaboratives and Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) initiatives. The five conditions are:

  1. Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI),
  2. Congestive Heart Failure (CHF),
  3. Pneumonia,
  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD),
  5. Patients transitioning from hospital to a skilled nursing facility (SNF).

I-MPACT helps their members understand the care transition process, especially from a patient perspective by performing an on-site observation of a patient’s discharge process and mapping the data gathered in a document called “the patient journey”.

Upon joining I-MPACT each new cluster, along with their patient advisors, attend a day long kick off where they work through mapping out a transition process, identifying gaps and challenges in their organizations’ care transitions and brain storming interventions aimed at addressing those gaps and challenges.

If you would like more information about I-MPACT check out their website at http://www.impactcqi.org/, contact Pamela James,  the Project Manager at  I-MPACTCC@med.umich.edu or contact the MVC Coordinating Center through Abeer Yassine (abeery@med.umich.edu ) or Deb Evans (debevans@med.umich.edu)

Older posts